Wonderful Free Teaching Resources

All Treats & No Tricks!

Every time October rolls around (which it seems to do annually, what's up with that?) I feel like I'm drowning. Suffocating under the weight of papers, forms, emails, and meetings. I read somewhere that a two hour meeting is exactly as productive as a single, well-written email.

It's true. Maybe it's just true for me because I'm a visual learner. But I don't think so.

When  Pam from Desktop Learning Adventure and I were toying with topic ideas for our October Secondary Smorgasbord blog hop, it occurred to us that everybody is completely fired fried (see how fried I am?), and a little treat is in order. What teachers need right now is a single, well-written email instead of a meeting.

Since we can't give you THAT, we will go with the next best thing. An assortment of wonderful free resources for your viewing and teaching pleasure.

My contribution is a useful freebie for teachers of all subjects. Before you look at it, let me ask you something. Have your students ever written something like this: "The book told me..." or "The article said..." or "I'm going to show you..." If they haven't used those phrases, this is not for you. Move on. You and your entire school system should move to Finland, the Land of Educational Excellence. You deserve it. Bravo.

Some of us aren't so lucky. My students insisted that books say things to them, and they have to announce their topic in a formal manner, like they are introducing Her Majesty, the Queen of England.

I now give you...
Her Royal Highness, the Argumentative Essay I Wrote that will tell you all about School Uniforms...

But when I went over these evidence based terminology handouts, all of that nonsense stopped. Like magic. The suggestions are funny, so kids remember them, and they are colorful, so kids don't mind looking at them. I blew these babies up as posters, and I gave the kids copies for their notebooks, so they can use the information in all of their classes.

 Evidence Based Terminology

No more excuses.

I know that because this blog post told me so. Or was it a single, well-written email?



17 comments

  1. Made me laugh, Darlene. Thanks for that, and thanks for the excellent treat! I know this because I said so. :)

    ReplyDelete
  2. Thanks for this! I will definitely be using this with my AP Biology students as we practice for the essay portion of the AP exam. They only have 22 minutes per essay, and the students want to waste their valuable time with phrases and clauses that are completely unnecessary. (Wish I could go to Finland!)

    ReplyDelete
  3. I really enjoyed your humour in this post, and that resource looks great!

    ReplyDelete
  4. I always love your posts, Darlene, and I especially love your freebie. I'm trying hard to banish "In this essay I am going to tell you..."and I'm sure I'm not alone! Thanks for sharing your great work.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The funny thing is in grad school a couple of professors made us say, "In this paper I will explain...."

      I try to teach signal phrases, and I love the humor in this product, however I am trying to cure my students from saying page numbers and paragraph numbers due to clunkiness. Page numbers would be in the citation, and paragraph numbers just aren't necessary in MLA format. This is something I struggle with- when do we switch from what is OK to isn't OK? Between grades, between scholastic levels? Students seem so lost and I know I was when I went to college.

      Thanks for putting on the blog hop- it's been so much fun going from post to post.

      Delete
  5. I'd love an email instead of a meeting- that would be an awesome treat! Your freebie is great and will come in very handy! I'm pinning it to some board to share it.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Darlene, this was a hilarious post! I so agree that in 30+ years of faculty and department meetings as well as PLC time, most could have been handled succinctly in bulleted emails. Hmmm. Maybe meeting leaders need copies of your Evidence-Based Terminology Tips, too.

    Connie

    ReplyDelete
  7. Darlene, this was a hilarious post! I so agree that in 30+ years of faculty and department meetings as well as PLC time, most could have been handled succinctly in bulleted emails. Hmmm. Maybe meeting leaders need copies of your Evidence-Based Terminology Tips, too.

    Connie

    ReplyDelete
  8. Nice! Super funny-post. Great reminder that a student could actually pull off an essay as long as they were incredibly hyperbolic and used the grandiose language correctly! Thanks for the resource!

    ReplyDelete
  9. You always make me laugh! I love a one-size-fits-all-guaranteed-to-get-you-in-Harvard-or-Yale resource and this fits the bill!

    ReplyDelete
  10. Thanks for organizing! I'm finally in on the fun. :)

    ReplyDelete
  11. Oh, could we please just have an email instead of a two hour meeting?! And yes, I see this kind of writing all of the time..."In this paper, I will..." I call it an "announcement" and tell students not to do it! Your resource will be a great help. Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
  12. Absolutely love this. Teaching students to write is already such a challenge. Teaching them to write well is a... well, it's just scary! Thank you for the great activity!

    ReplyDelete
  13. I love this - my students all had it in their writing folders last year and we referred to it often!!
    Happy Halloween!

    ReplyDelete
  14. Oh my gosh, Darlene, you addressed one of my pet peeves. There are anchor charts all over Pinterest instructing students to begin short constructed responses with, "The text said..." or "The book said..." And most of these charts have 100's of repins! So thanks for the practical and visually stunning freebie. (When I read your Finland relocation suggestion to teachers who have not received papers like the ones you described, I laughed out loud.)

    ReplyDelete
  15. My students are definitely not up to Finland's standards - they absolutely need your treat to help stop the pontification in their essays!! Thanks for your help!

    -Lisa
    Mrs. Spangler in the Middle

    ReplyDelete
  16. Your posts are so amazing Darlene! I don't know how you do it! (But keep it up!)

    Tammy @ Teaching FSL

    ReplyDelete

Back to Top